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MDMA, which is also known as Ecstasy or “Molly”, is an illegal synthetic amphetamine used as a stimulant and hallucinogen. Use of the drug is historically associated with the club scene and raves.  A September 2013 report from The National Institute on Drug Abuse describes the effects of MDMA as being similar to other stimulants and amphetamines. The effects include an increase in blood pressure and heart beat, muscle tension, nausea, faintness, and chills. The rapid heart rate and high blood pressure are very risky for people with circulatory problems or heart disease.  The report goes on to describe how MDMA is usually used with other “club drugs” such as Ketamine, cocaine, methamphetamine, alcohol and even Viagra. Consuming multiple types of drugs during a short period of time contributes to a high number of overdoses.
A CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report on June 11, 2010 describes 30 people who went to area hospitals after attending a New Year’s Eve rave in Los Angeles, CA.  Of the 30 people at the hospital, 29 were admitted for various drug and/or alcohol intoxications. The majority were between the ages of 16 and 34, with an average age of 21. Thirteen of the twenty-nine people also admitted to taking alcohol and drugs. There was one fatality involving someone who mixed drugs and alcohol, including the drug MDMA.
          Teenage use of MDMA is lower than the use of marijuana, but it is still noticeable enough to be charted by multiple studies.  After the rise in popularity of MDMA during the 1990s, demand for the drug has not subsided even after 20+ years. The table below displays information from a recent 2012 study from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.
Drug

 

Time
Period

 

8th-
Graders

 

10th-
Graders

 

12th-
Graders

 

MDMA

 

Lifetime

 

2

 

[5.0]

 

7.2

 

Past Year

 

[1.1]

 

[3.0]

 

[3.8]

 

Past Month

 

0.5

 

[1.0]

 

[0.9]

 

2012 Monitoring the Future (MTF) Study: for 8th-Graders, 10th-Graders, and 12th-Graders (in percent)*

 

 

Although MDMA has been rebranded as “Molly”, it is still the same “club drug” seen at raves in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Parents and anti-drug campaigns will need to focus on spreading education and awareness of this drug.
At Inspirations for Youth and Families, we will help treat your teen’s molly addiction and we will teach your child to have fun without using drugs or alcohol.