Education Director Denise Achee: Hi! So this is your last day?

Trevor W: Yes

DA: Yes? When are you leaving exactly?

TW: I’m leaving at 8 o’clock on Friday.

DA: Okay and how many days have you been here?

TW: 44.

DA: Would you like to share why you came here?

TW: Yeah.

DA: Go ahead.

TW: Alright. Well, I came here because I realized that I needed to get help and that my life had become unmanageable. I couldn’t do it by myself so I came to ask for help.

DA: So you came willingly?

TW: Yes ma’am.

DA: Did you ask your parents for help and then they found the place?

TW: Yeah, I asked my dad.

DA: Did you get court-ordered or you came willingly?

TW: No, I came willingly because I mean, my lifestyle was out of control.

DA: Can I ask you what you were using?

TW: I was using meth.

DA: Did you start with something else before you went into meth or how did it lead into meth?

TW: It started whenever I was nine. I started smoking marijuana and it gradually got to be more and more marijuana every day and then I went to pills and then I went to drinking [alcohol] and then from drinking I did meth one day and I tried heroin and I just spiraled out of control from there.

DA: Would you say that marijuana then is a gateway drug?

TW: Yes, very much so.

DA: For you it was definitely? It seems.

TW: Yes ma’am.

DA: What did you do about school during your time of use?

TW: I was going to school. I mean, I stopped like there for a while. I slowed down and started missing school. I stopped going to school and then so I got switched over to XIT school, which is like a secondary school, and then from there I mean I started doing my school online so I could get caught up. That’s how I got my diploma early. I got my diploma so…

DA: You attended our education component program here?

TW: Yes I still do that even though I have my diploma, just to get it fresh in my mind. I still work on it and I mean just as much as I hate school, I still do it so…

DA: Anything we learn is good, right? The more we learn the more we know, right?

TW: Yes.

DA: So it was a review for you in a sense?

TW: Yes ma’am.

DA: Did you learn something, like in math? Did it help you with math?

TW: Yes I mean it’s just like…like it freshened everything in my mind so I mean whenever I go to college I won’t be like I won’t forget anything. It’s all fresh in my mind.

DA: So you feel it was useful to attend even though you had your diploma?

TW: Yes.

DA: How was the therapy? How did your therapy go?

TW: My therapist is very good. They’re helpful. Anytime you have questions or anything they’re always willing to talk to you. There always willing to explain. Like if you don’t understand something they’ll explain it and not only one way, in multiple ways just so you know what it’s about you know? Like if you don’t understand it from one point of view they’ll put it in a different point of view. They really helped a lot.

DA: That’s great. So what is your plan for when you go home?

TW: When I go home I would like to get an NA sponsor and then start going to NA meetings so I can stay sober. Then I would like to get a job and start going to college, attending college so I can go and get my chemical engineering [degree] and so I’d like to do that.

DA: That’s wonderful. What a great plan! That’s exciting. Are you excited about that?

TW: Yeah I can’t wait.

DA: Do you feel that you have your life back?

TW: Yes I do.

DA: Alright. Congratulations. We’re very, very proud of you and you did a great job here. Keep in contact, we always like to hear from you when you leave to see how you’re doing. Thank you so much.

TW: I will. Thank you.