Over the past two decades, there has been a surge of people who abuse many different prescription drugs including opiates, anti-depressants, and stimulants. In 2012, about 2.4 million people used a prescription drug for the first time for a non-medical purpose. Data like this has led the FDA to enact new rules which limit how many pills and prescriptions one person can obtain in an effort to decrease the number of pills being given to a patient. This article discusses these changes and restrictions made by the FDA. These changes specifically address narcotic and opiate derived prescription drugs. The rule change rescheduled certain prescription drugs, like OxyContin. This means that patients cannot have a doctor call in a prescription to a pharmacy. Instead, the patient must physically bring the prescription to the pharmacy.

Hopefully these new rules will keep more prescription drugs off the street. The Gazette, an Iowa newspaper, published this article which discussed a segment of the population that has seen a large increase in prescription drug use – teenagers. The article cites the 2012 National Partnership Attitudes Survey which found that only 14% of parents warned teens about prescription drugs. Four out of ten teenagers surveyed said they took prescription drugs from their parents. It’s important for parents and grandparents to realize that they need to lock up their prescription drugs, or at least hide them in a safe place. It’s also important for people to properly dispose of unused prescription medication. Pharmacies will usually accept unused prescription medication and they will get rid of it safely.

Prescription drug use has risen dramatically over the years and with every rise in drug use different segments of the population will be affected. Most people might imagine that drug abusers only obtain a high by buying their drugs from a dealer. However, many addicts are able to get high by stealing a loved one’s medication. Teenagers might not always have the resources to get street drugs, but they can easily take one pill from a box sitting in the medicine cabinet.