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Teen “Glow Parties” are billed as safe, alcohol-free fun for those who are under the legal drinking age of 21. However, parents may not realize that these “glow” or “hyper-glow” parties are a breeding ground for drug use and sexual predators. The parties are massive and draw large crowds with some patrons as young as 16 years old. The pseudo-raves involve pulsating techno-music, glow sticks, and strobe lights lighting up the dance floor. According to this article, a “Hyperglow Party” was going to be held in Sayreville, N.J. until a “scheduling conflict” shut the even down. However, Middlesex County Acting Prosecutor Andrew Carey said his investigators applied just enough pressure to cancel the party.

Carey also had this to say about the event: “Just because an event is advertised for young people under 21, it does not mean that it is safe to attend. When it comes to club parties, the opposite is often true. Parents need to realize that such events are dangerous places due to the availability of the illicit drugs, as well as the presence of sexual predators, whose goal is to take advantage of incapacitated minors.”

Why the big fuss about a teenage party? Although it may seem as if the parties are safe for young people, they’re not. Many teenagers show up drunk to the alcohol-free events or they bring their own liquor concealed in water bottles, according to this article. The parties are also a major hub for drugs like molly, which is perceived by many young people as being a fun, socially acceptable drug to try.

Don’t let your teenager become another statistic. Make sure that he or she knows the dangers of trying drugs, especially molly which is usually little more than a combination of amphetamines and bath salts. These drugs can have long-term consequences on the user, including death. One electronic music festival was shut down halfway through the weekend when two people took molly and died later.