Inspirations for Youth and Families Intern Michael Jean recently had the opportunity to interview a member of the sobriety and recovery group, Alcoholics Anonymous. The interviewee’s name is withheld as per her request. 
The first step of drug addiction recovery is admitting there is a problem. When people seek recovery from their drug abuse they usually start by seeking treatment at a rehabilitation center. Their treatment program will usually involve detox, counseling, and therapy to rid them of their drug addiction.
After successfully completing drug addiction treatment, the next step is to find a support group to avoid relapse. Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous are two of the most popular support groups for recovering drug and alcohol addicts.  We spoke with one woman who says her support group has changed her life. Read the interview below.
 
Q: How long have you been sober? Why is staying sober important to you?
A: 15 months sober.  It’s not only changed my life but it’s also given me a life worth living today.  It has taught [me] love, tolerance, patience and it has taught me to love myself even with all of my defects.  And of course I can give my daughters a mommy that they can look up to and that they can be proud of. 
Q: Who do you consider the most important person to aid you in your recovery?
A: First it’s God.  I tell [God] everyday how grateful I am. Second, my sponsor [who] gave me the gift of the 12 steps, which were given to her. 
Q: What have you learned in recovery and AA?
A: The 12 steps brought me closer to God (my higher power), it’s not just a way to stay sober, and it teaches you how to live when you practice the 12 steps /principles in everything that we do.
Q: Is there anything else you wanted to share?
A: AA and NA save lives every day and it has since 1939.  The Big Book of AA gives us our solution and it helps us identify so that we don’t ever feel alone.  The 12 steps [program] re-teach how to live.  The meetings are the fellowship that we crave and we meet others just like us. 
NA and AA help people to continue to grow after leaving treatment.  The support groups are anonymous, yet their impact can be felt by many people including family and friends who support its members. If you are a recovering drug addict, know that there is help out there for you. You are not alone.