Anti-anxiety drugs (a.k.a. benzodiazepines or benzos) are medically recognized for their powerful tranquilizing effects. You might recognize the brand names of these drugs, which include Xanax, Klonopin, Valium, and Ativan. 

Valium pills, known generically as diazepam

What is the clinical definition of anxiety? 

          Anxiety is the painful or apprehensive uneasiness of mind, according to the dictionary. Anxiety is a common emotion shared by many people, but for some it may be debilitating. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADDA), “Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the U.S. affecting 40 million adults in the United States age 18 and older (18% of the United States population)”.
            
Is it easy to get a benzodiazepine prescription? 

          The only way to get a prescription from a reputable doctor is if you suffer from severe anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, or if you have had a recent operation. Unfortunately, many people are also able to find these drugs on the streets. Benzos are highly addictive and they work by reducing brain activity. Side effects include drowsiness, loss of coordination, loss of focus, weakness, dizziness, confusion, aggression, impulsivity, depression, suicidal thoughts and death.

          The use of benzodiazepines is growing in the USA. “The number of benzo admissions nearly tripled between 1998 and 2008, while overall treatment admissions only increased by 11%”, according to the Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions for Abuse (SATAA). A study by the SATAA also found that teen users ages 12-17 were accountable for 7.5 % of benzodiazepine admissions. Some of those teenagers that reported benzo use also reported they used other illegal substances like opiates, alcohol, marijuana, or cocaine.

How can you tell if your teenager is abusing a benzodiazepine? 

          You should look for signs that include failing grades, reduced work ethic, and behavioral problems. Those addicted to benzodiazepines must find a treatment center that is right for them. If you know your child is abusing this drug, don’t wait to get help! Call us today at Inspirations for Youth and Families at (888) 757-6237.